SphericalHarmonicModes.jl

Iterators to loop over pairs of spherical-harmonic modes by respecting the limits on each parameter
Author jishnub
Popularity
2 Stars
Updated Last
1 Year Ago
Started In
July 2019

SphericalHarmonicModes.jl

CI Coverage Status Stable Dev

This package provides a few iterators that are relevant in the context of spherical harmonics. The goal of this project is to convert multi-dimensional Cartesian indices to one-dimensional ones. They may therefore be used for indexing arrays, and would allow storing arrays of spherical harmonic coefficients contiguously. There is also the package SphericalHarmonicArrays.jl that uses these iterators for indexing.

The iterators implemented currently are:

  1. LM and ML: Two iterators to loop over spherical harmonic modes denoted by (l,m), where l is the angular degree and m is the azimuthal order.
  2. L2L1Triangle: An iterator to loop over pairs of spherical harmonic degrees l2 and l1 that satisfy the triangle condition |l1-Δl| <= l2 <= l1+Δl. The iterator generates pairs of (l2,l1) for a specified range of l1 and all Δl that satisfy 0 ⩽ Δl ⩽ Δl_max for a specified Δl_max. Optionally a bound on l2 may be specified.

Getting Started

Installing

] add SphericalHarmonicModes

julia> using SphericalHarmonicModes

Usage

Creating a spherical harmonic mode iterator

There are two different orderings possible to iterate over spherical harmonic modes, with either l or m increasing faster than the other. They are denoted by LM and ML, where --- going by the Julia convention of column-major arrays --- the first index increases faster than the second. Irrespective of which ordering is chosen, the modes are always returned as (l,m) when the iterators are looped over.

Both the iterators are created using the general syntax itr(l_range, m_range) where itr may be LM or ML. To create an iterator with m increasing faster than l:

julia> itr = ML(0:1, -1:1)
Spherical harmonic modes with m increasing faster than l
(l_min = 0, l_max = 1, m_min = -1, m_max = 1)

julia> collect(itr)
4-element Array{Tuple{Int64,Int64},1}:
 (0, 0) 
 (1, -1)
 (1, 0) 
 (1, 1)

To create an iterator with l increasing faster than m:

julia> itr = LM(0:1, -1:1)
Spherical harmonic modes with l increasing faster than m
(l_min = 0, l_max = 1, m_min = -1, m_max = 1)

julia> collect(itr)
4-element Array{Tuple{Int64,Int64},1}:
 (1, -1)
 (0, 0) 
 (1, 0) 
 (1, 1)

Special constructors to include all m's are available for convenience.

julia> LM(2:4) # a range in l, and all valid m for each l
Spherical harmonic modes with l increasing faster than m
(l_min = 2, l_max = 4, m_min = -4, m_max = 4)

Creating an (l2,l1) iterator

This iterator may be created as L2L1Triangle(l1_min,l1_max,Δl_max,l2_min,l2_max), for example

julia> itr = L2L1Triangle(1,3,2,2,4)
Spherical harmonic modes (l2,l1) that satisfy l1 - 2 ⩽ l2 ⩽ l1 + 2, with 2 ⩽ l2 ⩽ 4 and 1 ⩽ l1 ⩽ 3

julia> collect(itr)
8-element Array{Tuple{Int64,Int64},1}:
 (2, 1)
 (3, 1)
 (2, 2)
 (3, 2)
 (4, 2)
 (2, 3)
 (3, 3)
 (4, 3)

The ranges of l1 and l2 will be clipped to the maximal valid subset dictated by Δl_max.

Using the iterators

The length of an iterator can be computed in O(1) time.

julia> @btime length(m) setup=(m=LM(0:rand(1:1000000)))
  3.197 ns (0 allocations: 0 bytes)

It is easy to check whether a mode is present in the iterator. This can also be checked in O(1) time.

julia> @btime el in m setup=(m=LM(0:rand(1:1000000)); el=(rand(1:100),rand(1:100)))
  7.307 ns (0 allocations: 0 bytes)

The index at which a mode is present can be checked using modeindex. For example

julia> itr = ML(0:2,-1:2);

julia> collect(itr)
8-element Array{Tuple{Int64,Int64},1}:
 (0, 0) 
 (1, -1)
 (1, 0) 
 (1, 1) 
 (2, -1)
 (2, 0) 
 (2, 1) 
 (2, 2) 

julia> modeindex(itr,(1,0))
3

julia> modeindex(itr,(2,2))
8

This is also evaluated in O(1) time.

julia> itr = ML(0:20000);

julia> @btime modeindex($itr,el) setup=(el=(rand(1000:20000),rand(1:1000)))
  6.386 ns (0 allocations: 0 bytes)

julia> itr = LM(0:20000);

julia> @btime modeindex($itr,el) setup=(el=(rand(1000:20000),rand(1:1000)))
  9.595 ns (0 allocations: 0 bytes)

julia> itr = L2L1Triangle(1:100, 100);

julia> @btime modeindex($itr,el) setup=(el=(rand(1:100),rand(1:100)))
  15.411 ns (0 allocations: 0 bytes)

Indexing is not supported at the moment, but the last element can be obtained easily.

julia> itr = ML(0:2,-1:2);

julia> collect(itr)[end]
(2, 2)

julia> last(itr)
(2, 2)

julia> itr = ML(0:20000);

julia> @btime last(m) setup=(m=ML(0:rand(1:20000)))
  3.734 ns (0 allocations: 0 bytes)

License

This project is licensed under the MIT License - see the LICENSE.md file for details.

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