Ccluster.jl

Julia wrapper for Ccluster
Author rimbach
Popularity
1 Star
Updated Last
7 Months Ago
Started In
February 2018

Ccluster.jl

Ccluster.jl is a Julia wrapper for Ccluster (https://github.com/rimbach/Ccluster.git) that implements a clustering algorithm for univariate polynomials whose coefficients are complex numbers.

Ccluster.jl also provides a clustering function for triangular systems of polynomial equations.

Ccluster.jl is compatible with julia >= 1.1.0.

The Branch compat-julia-v0.6 is compatible with julia 0.6, but is not intended to be maintained.

Brief description

Univariate solver

The main function provided by Ccluster.jl is ccluster. It takes as input a polynomial P in C[z], a square complex box B and a precision eps.

It outputs a set of natural clusters of roots together with the sum of multiplicities of the roots in each cluster. A cluster is a complex disc D containing at least one root, and it is natural when 3D contains the same roots than D. Each root of P in B is in exactly one cluster of the output, and clusters may contain roots of P in 2B.

Input polynomial P can be given as an oracle polynomial, that is a function returning arbitrary precision approximations of coefficients of P. In case where P has rational coefficients, it can be given exactly.

To cluster all the roots of P, a bound on their modulus (e.g. Fujiwara bound) to find an initial box B containing all the roots. This is done in ccluster when it is called with no input box. Notice that input oracle for P must have no zero leading coefficients.

The implemented algorithm is described here: https://dl.acm.org/citation.cfm?id=2930939

Please cite: https://link.springer.com/chapter/10.1007/978-3-319-96418-8_28 if you use it in your research.

Solver for triangular systems

The notion of natural clusters is straightforwardly extended to the multivariate case. Our function tcluster (t for triangular) takes as input a triangular polynomial system P which polynomials have rational coefficients, a vector of square complex boxes B and a precision eps.

It outputs a set of natural clusters of solutions of P together with the sum of multiplicities of the solutions in each cluster. Each solution of P in B is in exactly one cluster of the output, and clusters may contain solutions of P in 2B.

Let z1<z2<...<zn. Input triangular system P: f1=f2=...=fn=0 must satisfy:

  • S has a finite number of solutions,
  • greatest variable in fi is zi and deg(fi,zi)>0.

Notice that we do not require simple solutions, and we do not require that the leading coefficient of fi has no common factor with the fj's for j<i.

In the special case where the leading coefficient of fi has no common factor with the fj's for j<i (for instance P is a regular chain), tcluster returns all solutions of P when no initial vector of square complex boxes B is given in input.

The implemented algorithm is described here: https://arxiv.org/abs/1806.10164

Installation

Enter the packages manager with

]

then install the last registered version with:

add Ccluster.jl

Alternatively, install the last version with:

add https://github.com/rimbach/Ccluster.jl

Ccluster depends on Nemo that will be automatically installed.

For graphical outputs, install the package CclusterPlot with

add https://github.com/rimbach/CclusterPlot.jl

in the packages manager.

CclusterPlot depends on PyCall and PyPlot, and requires that matplotlib is installed on your system. It is heavy both to install and to load.

Usage: univariate solver

Simple example: clustering the roots of a Mignotte-like polynomial

See the file examples/mignotte.jl

using Nemo

R, x = PolynomialRing(QQ, "x")

d=64
a=14
P = x^d - 2*((2^a)*x-1)^2 #mignotte polynomial

using Ccluster

bInit = [fmpq(0,1),fmpq(0,1),fmpq(4,1)] #box centered in 0 + sqrt(-1)*0 with width 4
precision = 53                          #get clusters of size 2^-53

Res = ccluster(P, bInit, precision, verbosity="silent");
                                        #verbosity can take value "silent" (default value),
                                        #                         "brief" (brief report),
                                        #                         "results" (clusters are printed)

For computing all the roots of P, do:

Res = ccluster(P, precision, verbosity="silent");

Res is an array of couples (sum of multiplicity, disc):

63-element Array{Any,1}:
 Any[1, Nemo.fmpq[975//1024, 1025//1024, 15//2048]]      
 ⋮                                                      
 Any[1, Nemo.fmpq[-2995//4096, 4805//4096, 15//8192]] 
 Any[2, Nemo.fmpq[0, 0, 15//16384]]                     # the cluster with sum of multiplicity 2
 Any[1, Nemo.fmpq[6935//8192, -8955//8192, 15//16384]]
 Any[1, Nemo.fmpq[6935//8192, 8955//8192, 15//16384]]

each element of Res being an array which

  • second element is a complex disc (defined by the real and imaginary parts of its center and its radius)
  • first element is the sum of multiplicities of the roots in the disk.

If you care about geometry, so do we. If you have installed CclusterPlot.jl, you can plot the clusters with:

using CclusterPlot

plotCcluster(Res)

or

plotCcluster(Res, bInit, focus=false)

The last argument is a flag telling the function wether to focus on clusters (when true) or not (when false). You can also add markers=false as an optional argument to avoid plotting approximations of the roots with markers.

Other example: clustering the roots of a polynomial whose coefficients are roots of polynomials

See the file examples/coeffsBernoulli.jl

Find the 64 roots of the Bernoulli polynomial of degree 64

using Nemo

RR, x = PolynomialRing(Nemo.QQ, "x")

n = 64 #degree
P = zero(RR)
bernoulli_cache(n)
for k = 0:n
    global P
    coefficient = (binom(n,k))*(bernoulli(n-k))
    P = P + coefficient*x^k
end #P is now the Bernoulli polynomial of degree 64

using Ccluster

bInit = [fmpq(0,1),fmpq(0,1),fmpq(100,1)] #box centered in 0 + sqrt(-1)*0 with width 100
precision = 53                          #get clusters of size 2^-53
Coeffs = ccluster(P, bInit, precision)

Define an approximation function for the polynomial whose coefficients are the found roots

function getApproximation( dest::Ptr{acb_poly}, preci::Int )

    function getApp(prec::Int)::Nemo.acb_poly
        eps=fmpq(1,fmpz(2)^prec)
        R = Nemo.RealField(prec)
        C = Nemo.ComplexField(prec)
        CC, y = PolynomialRing(C, "y")
        res = zero(CC)
        for i=1:n
            btemp = [ Coeffs[i][2][1], Coeffs[i][2][2], 2*Coeffs[i][2][3] ]
            temp = ccluster(P, btemp, prec)
            approx::Nemo.acb = C( Nemo.ball(R(temp[1][2][1]),R(eps)), Nemo.ball(R(temp[1][2][2]),R(eps)))
            res = res + approx*y^(i-1)
        end
        return res
    end
    
    precTemp::Int = 2*preci
    poly = getApp(precTemp)
    
    while Ccluster.checkAccuracy( poly, preci ) == 0
            precTemp = 2*precTemp
            poly = getApp(precTemp)
    end
    
    Ccluster.ptr_set_acb_poly(dest, poly)
end

Cluster the roots

bInit = [fmpq(0,1),fmpq(0,1),fmpq(100,1)] #box centered in 0 + sqrt(-1)*0 with width 100
precision = 53                          #get clusters of size 2^-53
Roots = ccluster(getApproximation, bInit, precision, verbosity="brief")

Output (total time in s on a Intel(R) Core(TM) i7-7600U CPU @ 2.80GHz):

 -------------------Ccluster: ----------------------------------------
 -------------------Input:    ----------------------------------------
|box: cRe: 0                cIm: 0                wid: 100            |
|eps: 1/100                                                           |
|strat: newton tstarOpt predPrec anticip                              |
 -------------------Output:   ----------------------------------------
|number of clusters:                                 63               |
|number of solutions:                                63               |
 -------------------Stats:    ----------------------------------------
|total time:                                   1.802102               |
 ---------------------------------------------------------------------
63-element Array{Any,1}:
 Any[1, Nemo.fmpq[-3125//32768, 5125//8192, 375//65536]]    
 ⋮                                                              
 Any[1, Nemo.fmpq[211625//262144, -105125//262144, 375//524288]]

Defining an approximation function

ccluster takes as input a function prototyped as:

function getApproximation( dest::Ptr{Nemo.acb_poly}, p::Int )

Here is an example for a polynomial with complex coefficients (see also the file examples/spiral.jl)

degr=64
function getApproximation( dest::Ptr{acb_poly}, precision::Int )
    
    function getAppSpiral( degree::Int, prec::Int )::Nemo.acb_poly
        CC = ComplexField(prec)
        R2, y = PolynomialRing(CC, "y")
        res = R2(1)
        for k=1:degree
            modu = fmpq(k,degree)
            argu = fmpq(4*k,degree)
            root = modu*Nemo.exppii(CC(argu))
            res = res * (y-root)
        end
        return res
    end
    
    precTemp::Int = 2*precision
    poly = getAppSpiral( degr, precTemp)
    
    while Ccluster.checkAccuracy( poly, precision ) == 0
            precTemp = 2*precTemp
            poly = getAppSpiral(degr, precTemp)
    end
    
    Ccluster.ptr_set_acb_poly(dest, poly)

end

Defining an initial box

The initial box is an array of three Nemo.fmpq defining respectively the real part of the center, the imaginary part of the center and the width of the box.

The following code:

bInit = [fmpq(0,1),fmpq(0,1),fmpq(150,1)]

defines a box centered in 0+i0 with width 150.

The precision

The precision is an integer p. Ccluster computes clusters of size eps=2^-p.

The verbosity flag

The last, optional, argument of ccluster is a verbosity flag. When no verbosity is given, ccluster is silent. Values can be "brief" and "results".

Usage: solver for triangular systems

Simple example: clustering the roots of a Mignotte-like polynomial

See the file examples/triangularSys.jl

using Nemo
using Ccluster

Rx, x = PolynomialRing(QQ, "x") #Ring of polynomials in x with rational coefficients
Syx, y = PolynomialRing(Rx, "y") #Ring of polynomials in y with coefficients that are in Rx

d1=30
c = 10
delta=128
d2=10

twotodelta = fmpq(2,1)^(delta)
f  = Rx( x^d1 - (twotodelta*x-1)^(c) )
g = Syx( y^d2 - x^d2 )

precision = 53
bInitx = [fmpq(0,1),fmpq(0,1),fmpq(10,1)^40]

nbSols, clusters, ellapsedTime = tcluster( [f,g], [bInitx], precision, verbosity = "silent" );

Here g is monic and its leading coefficient has no common factor with f. In general, you can check this property using Nemo.gcd:

Nemo.gcd(f,Nemo.lead(g))

Providing this is 1, compute clusters containing all the solutions with:

nbSols, clusters, ellapsedTime = tcluster( [f,g], precision, verbosity = "silent" );

nbSols is the total number of solutions (counted with multiplicity), clusters is an array of clusters of solutions and ellapsedTime is the time spent to solve the system.

Each element in clusters is an array which first element is the sum of multiplicities of the solution in the cluster and second element is a precision-bit approximation of the solutions (of type Nemo::acb).

You can print the clusters with:

printClusters(stdout, nbSols, clusters)

Used By Packages

No packages found.